Showing posts tagged: photography

  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.

“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via

When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 

Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 

The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.

  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.
  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.
  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.
  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.
  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.
  • The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via
The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolved—unplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.

The Story of Kowloon Walled City | Via

The early phases of the Walled City were characterized by predictable building typologies and the buildings were constructed on the principle of squatters’ rights, with random construction on spots of available land by whoever got there first. Alleyways and passages evolvedunplanned—into the established ‘map’ of the city, which would remain until it came down. A basic electric supply existed, increasingly burdened by illegal connections that frequently overloaded the system, and the few standpipes supplied the only water. As the need to accommodate the ever growing residential and commercial populations forced it to in the 1960s, the building typology of the Walled City made the leap from two- to three-story residential structures to taller, six- to seven-story ones. This represented an important threshold, because at these greater heights the buildings unavoidably became more complex and required greater labor to realize, reinforced concrete, more investment, and so on.

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