Showing posts tagged: photography

  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.
  • Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via
Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.
In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.

Abandoned Duck Blinds | Dave Jordano | Via

Along the banks of the Mississippi River on the solid ice, duck hunters set up blinds, a cover device designed to conceal, and at the same time, shelter hunters while they wait for ducks to fly overhead. Duck blinds can be as simple as a natural depression on the ground, but in Midwestern United States, they are often elaborate structures, approaching the size and function of a small cabin with amenities.

In the winter of 2008, when photographer Dave Jordano headed West from Chicago, his home base, to the frozen Mississippi he chanced upon these structures, frail from being exposed to the elements. At first glance, there’s not much to a duck blind - they’re humble, often small structures made of simple materials—wood, paint, nails, netting, and bits of brush or grass. But Dave Jordano could see the beauty in them.

  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.
  • Frameworks | Sam Laughlin
Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis. 
In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.

Frameworks | Sam Laughlin

Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis.

In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.

  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.
  • Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via
The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.

Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via

The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.

  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus
  • Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via
“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.
“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”
-Christoph Morlinghaus

Form/Faith | Christoph Morlinghaus | Via

“I try to keep my photography as distinct as I can from personal interpretations,” says the photographer, whose exposures can be as long as 45 minutes in some of the darkened cathedrals. In all, Morlinghaus photographed 17 places of worship with his Sinar P2 8×10 large format film camera. All but Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, are in the United States. In every case, Morlinghaus says, clergy and custodians were proud to welcome him in.

“These ecclesiastical buildings were the most accessible interiors that I ever photographed,” he says. “Rarely, have I encountered more cooperative or welcoming people.”

-Christoph Morlinghaus

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