Showing posts tagged: photography

  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.

‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  

According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.

The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.

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