Showing posts tagged: photography

  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.
  • Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via
In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.
"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.

Parade: Urban Explorations | Guillaume Martial | Via

In the 19th century, photographers accompanied archaeological expeditions and created images of the ruins of ancient civilizations to bring back to modern civilization. Today, Guillaume Martial has found strange architectural objects in our every day environment and gives them a similar treatment. For example, Martial uses the pictorial convention of placing figures in the photographs to measure the size of the objects and test how they might have been used in the past. Some of the objects appear as if they were built to honor a deity. Other pictures suggest that the objects might have been sites for human sacrifice, rituals performed to curry favor with a divine agency. If this is the case, they might have been built to worship the deity known as Jacques Tati.

"PARADE" questions our appropriation of the urban space. By playing a clever body language game, Guillaume Martial depicts a character (himself) seeking by all means to make sense of the street furniture. The result is a new reading of the landscape, surreal, absurd and comic.

  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.

Restore | Mattia Mognetti

Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.

  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.

Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via

Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.

“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”

Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.

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