Showing posts tagged: photography

  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.
  • Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via
Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.
“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”
Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.

Scrublands | Antoine Bruy | Via

Whenever the emails pile up or the traffic grinds to a crawl, many of us fantasize about leaving it all behind and unplugging from the grid. The people in Antoine Bruy’s ongoing photo series Scrublands have actually followed through, disconnecting from the trappings of modern life even when it means jumping into a new lifestyle they know nothing about.

“I wanted to meet them and see how they managed to learn something which they were not used to,” says Bruy, who lives in France. “Most of the people are not from farming families or anything.”

Bruy has been photographing around Europe for the project since 2012, visiting some 15 encampments in his home country as well as in Romania, Spain, Switzerland, and Wales. He’s focused on those who survive as sustenance farmers, by raising livestock, or hunting. Now he’s holding a crowdfunding campaignbecause he’d like to extend the project to the United States, the country whose history he says inspired many of his subjects.

  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.
  • Deadline | Will Steacy | Via
With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.
Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.

Deadline | Will Steacy | Via

With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.

Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.

  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 

Conclusus | Alberto Campo BaezaFabio Candido

In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.

The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.

From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.

This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.

The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
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