Showing posts tagged: illustration

  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.
  • Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via
Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.

Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via

Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.

  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.
  • The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio
The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.

The Invention of Los Angeles | Ed Ruscha | Socks Studio

The artist executed the apartment drawings, after selecting ten images that appealed to him for the compositions, flatness, format, and color (or the lack thereof). Ruscha favored a photographic look for his artworks but distanced from a merely documental, literal reproduction of the city’s ordinary buildings. A direct comparison between the drawings and the relative photographs reveal how Ruscha adapted and simplified the original images: the telephonic lines were eliminated, the texture skins of the buildings smoothed out, the palms fronds stylized. The proportions of the buildings were deeply modified, as well: their height and perspective were accentuated by compression into a horizontal sheet; the width of the central shaft of balconies were increased to create a more severe composition of planes; angles and architectural details or decorative light fixtures were added to increase spatial patterning and heighten shadow contrast.

  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.
  • Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio
Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.
According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.
His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.

Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio

Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.

According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.

His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.

  • Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via
There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground
Ground is curved
Ground is fluid
Ground is surface
Ground receives man’s shadow
Ground receives man’s body.
Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground
Architecture is language.
  • Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via
There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground
Ground is curved
Ground is fluid
Ground is surface
Ground receives man’s shadow
Ground receives man’s body.
Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground
Architecture is language.
  • Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via
There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground
Ground is curved
Ground is fluid
Ground is surface
Ground receives man’s shadow
Ground receives man’s body.
Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground
Architecture is language.
  • Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via
There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground
Ground is curved
Ground is fluid
Ground is surface
Ground receives man’s shadow
Ground receives man’s body.
Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground
Architecture is language.
  • Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via
There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground
Ground is curved
Ground is fluid
Ground is surface
Ground receives man’s shadow
Ground receives man’s body.
Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground
Architecture is language.

Man and Ground | Anna Pietrzak | Via

There is a constant presence in man’s life. The presence of ground

Ground is curved

Ground is fluid

Ground is surface

Ground receives man’s shadow

Ground receives man’s body.

Man knows ground through building Building is dialogue; a story that lives in work. Ground asks questions to building Building demands answers from ground

Architecture is language.

  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.
  • ‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio
Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.
His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.
The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.

‘Metaphysics’ and other Dystopian Illustrations | Erdem Ergaz | Socks Studio

Erdem Ergaz (1977) is a Turkish painter living and working as an artist and teacher in Istanbul.

His paintings focus on the collision/adaptation of the human being with  the technological era, seen from the angle of faith, supernatural events and conflicts.

The technological drive inherent in Ergaz’s metaphysical worlds is accentuated through drawings whose aesthetics reminds either that of early computer graphics vectorial imagery, and that of information graphics such as the flight safey instructions.

  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.
  • The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery
The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.

The Shed | Jonas Gunerius Larsen | The Draftery

The project has a static starting point with the grid as an overarching principle that consumes the site, the infrastructure and organizing the totality. But then a dynamic process starts: Sheds and small cabins emerge within the system, representing plausible inhabitants, scenarios emerge and stories develop. Evolvement on the microlevel is explored in the plots, they become alive, some are abandoned and some survive. The stories come to life, public places occur, buildings transfom. The project grows out of this back and forth process, where the tiny dynamic parts challenges and even dissolves the boundaries of the assumed static grid. This pendulum is the energy in the evolution in the project, the unpredictable mutuality of part and whole.

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