Showing posts tagged: history

  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.

Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via

Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.

From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.

Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.

  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.
  • House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio
Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.

House Movers of San Francisco | Dave Glass | Socks Studio

Freelance San Francisco-based photographer Dave Glass documented the urban renewal effort in San Francisco’s area of Western Addition that, in the second half of the 1970’s, involved the relocation of many 19th century victorian buildings to their new permanent locations. A relocated house could be purchased from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for $1 (one dollar) plus relocation and restoration costs.

  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.
  • Restore | Mattia Mognetti
Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.

Restore | Mattia Mognetti

Restore is a project about ancient places of worship. Most of these architectural masterpieces are located near the centre of the city and too often the contemporary urbanization has been sadly unscrupulous on them. The aim of the project was to bring them back to the origins. The influence of the modern urban elements attempts to be as much as possible controlled by the technical choices and the radical postprocessing/retouching approach.

  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.
  • Constructing Disneyland | Via
Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.

Constructing Disneyland | Via

Disneyland Park, originally Disneyland, is the first of two theme parks built at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, opened on July 17, 1955. It is the only theme park designed and built under the direct supervision of Walt Disney. It was originally the only attraction on the property; its name was changed to Disneyland Park to distinguish it from the expanding complex in the 1990s.

Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Walt bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954 and the park was unveiled during a special televised press event on the ABC Television Network on July 17, 1955.

  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.

Early Las Vegas | Via

Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.

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