Showing posts tagged: history

  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.
  • Early Las Vegas | Via
Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.

Early Las Vegas | Via

Industrial photographer Howard Kelly usually flew around Southern California shooting oblique aerial images of the landscape. One day in 1959, he crossed over into Nevada and captured a dusty Las Vegas, including shots of the Stardust, Flamingo, Sands, Tropicana, Thunderbird, Riviera, Dunes, New Frontier, & Showboat Hotels, along with the Clark County Courthouse and Bonanza Airlines.

  • Great War Commemorative Sculptures | Gerry Judah | Via
Gerry Judah’s twin sculptures in the nave of St Paul’s Cathedral have been erected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. Their white cruciform shapes evoking the meticulously maintained war graves of northern France and further afield, in fact represent an utterly contemporary questioning of the continued need for warfare.
This is public art unafraid of the obvious, not footling with self-expression or abstract aesthetics, but with the world as it was and as it is. And yet in the embedded themes are the great abstracts: God, life, death, love, despair and hope.
  • Great War Commemorative Sculptures | Gerry Judah | Via
Gerry Judah’s twin sculptures in the nave of St Paul’s Cathedral have been erected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. Their white cruciform shapes evoking the meticulously maintained war graves of northern France and further afield, in fact represent an utterly contemporary questioning of the continued need for warfare.
This is public art unafraid of the obvious, not footling with self-expression or abstract aesthetics, but with the world as it was and as it is. And yet in the embedded themes are the great abstracts: God, life, death, love, despair and hope.
  • Great War Commemorative Sculptures | Gerry Judah | Via
Gerry Judah’s twin sculptures in the nave of St Paul’s Cathedral have been erected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. Their white cruciform shapes evoking the meticulously maintained war graves of northern France and further afield, in fact represent an utterly contemporary questioning of the continued need for warfare.
This is public art unafraid of the obvious, not footling with self-expression or abstract aesthetics, but with the world as it was and as it is. And yet in the embedded themes are the great abstracts: God, life, death, love, despair and hope.
  • Great War Commemorative Sculptures | Gerry Judah | Via
Gerry Judah’s twin sculptures in the nave of St Paul’s Cathedral have been erected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. Their white cruciform shapes evoking the meticulously maintained war graves of northern France and further afield, in fact represent an utterly contemporary questioning of the continued need for warfare.
This is public art unafraid of the obvious, not footling with self-expression or abstract aesthetics, but with the world as it was and as it is. And yet in the embedded themes are the great abstracts: God, life, death, love, despair and hope.

Great War Commemorative Sculptures | Gerry Judah | Via

Gerry Judah’s twin sculptures in the nave of St Paul’s Cathedral have been erected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. Their white cruciform shapes evoking the meticulously maintained war graves of northern France and further afield, in fact represent an utterly contemporary questioning of the continued need for warfare.

This is public art unafraid of the obvious, not footling with self-expression or abstract aesthetics, but with the world as it was and as it is. And yet in the embedded themes are the great abstracts: God, life, death, love, despair and hope.

  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”
  • Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via
As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.
Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.
“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”

Atlantic Wall | Stephan Vanfleteren | Via

As the war in Europe raged through the early 1940s, Germany built thousands of concrete bunkers to defend the continent’s western shore from an Allied sea attack. This Atlantic Wall stretched from Norway to the border of France and Spain, and what remains all these decades later is darkly beautiful.

Photographer Stephan Vanfleteren, 44, grew up near some of these structures as a child living in Belgium, but never thought much of them. They were just crumbling concrete relics of the past. That changed last year, however, when he returned to the Belgian coast to photograph bunkers for the Museum Atlantikwall at Raversyde–Belgium. Seeing them with fresh eyes, he was immediately taken by their graceful, elegant design. He produced a series of beautiful black and white photographs that soon will be released as a book.

“Some of the buildings reminded me of the Guggenheim museum or the Fallingwater house by Frank Lloyd Wright,” says Vanfleteren, who still lives in Belgium. “These were buildings made for strategic defense but there was also real beauty and a connection with modern architecture.”

  • Disneyland Original Prospectus | Via
These extremely high-resolution scans were made from one of the three sets of pitch-documents Roy and Walt Disney used to raise the money to build Disneyland. There are no archive copies of this document. Neither the Walt Disney Company nor the Walt Disney Family Museum have it. But we certainly hope both organizations will download these documents for inclusion in their collections.
Roy Disney — the Disney brother who controlled the company’s finances - — didn’t like the idea of Disneyland at first. Walt Disney poached the best talent from the studios to help him flesh out his idea for a new kind of amusement park, eventually winning over Roy, who helped him raise the $17 million it took to build Disneyland.
The first animator Walt took into the project was the legendary Herb Ryman. Over the course of a weekend in 1953, Walt and Herb drew the storied first map of Disneyland, as pictured here. An additional eight typed pages of description and sales copy were added to these pages and the resulting “brochure” was used as an unsuccessful pitch session that Walt and Herb conducted for three different New York bankers.
  • Disneyland Original Prospectus | Via
These extremely high-resolution scans were made from one of the three sets of pitch-documents Roy and Walt Disney used to raise the money to build Disneyland. There are no archive copies of this document. Neither the Walt Disney Company nor the Walt Disney Family Museum have it. But we certainly hope both organizations will download these documents for inclusion in their collections.
Roy Disney — the Disney brother who controlled the company’s finances - — didn’t like the idea of Disneyland at first. Walt Disney poached the best talent from the studios to help him flesh out his idea for a new kind of amusement park, eventually winning over Roy, who helped him raise the $17 million it took to build Disneyland.
The first animator Walt took into the project was the legendary Herb Ryman. Over the course of a weekend in 1953, Walt and Herb drew the storied first map of Disneyland, as pictured here. An additional eight typed pages of description and sales copy were added to these pages and the resulting “brochure” was used as an unsuccessful pitch session that Walt and Herb conducted for three different New York bankers.

Disneyland Original Prospectus | Via

These extremely high-resolution scans were made from one of the three sets of pitch-documents Roy and Walt Disney used to raise the money to build Disneyland. There are no archive copies of this document. Neither the Walt Disney Company nor the Walt Disney Family Museum have it. But we certainly hope both organizations will download these documents for inclusion in their collections.

Roy Disney — the Disney brother who controlled the company’s finances - — didn’t like the idea of Disneyland at first. Walt Disney poached the best talent from the studios to help him flesh out his idea for a new kind of amusement park, eventually winning over Roy, who helped him raise the $17 million it took to build Disneyland.

The first animator Walt took into the project was the legendary Herb Ryman. Over the course of a weekend in 1953, Walt and Herb drew the storied first map of Disneyland, as pictured here. An additional eight typed pages of description and sales copy were added to these pages and the resulting “brochure” was used as an unsuccessful pitch session that Walt and Herb conducted for three different New York bankers.

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