Showing posts tagged: history

  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.

“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.
  • When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG
Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 
Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.

When Hills Hide Arches | BLDG BLOG

Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. 

Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient, approaching a point of chemical age as comparatively old to us today as the structures they depict were to the military expeditions that documented them in the first place. 

Domes and extraordinary arches stand in the middle of nowhere, as if left behind by the receding tide of some alien civilization that once slid through here, depositing works of architecture in its wake. Like the slime of a snail, these are just residue, empty proof that something much bigger once passed by.

  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.
  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.
  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.
  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.
  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.
  • A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio
Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.
Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.

A Visionary at the Age of Reason | Jean-Jacques Lequeu | Socks Studio

Jean-Jacques Lequeu (Architect, 1757-1825) worked in France at the same time of Etienne-Louis Boullée (1728-1799) andClaude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736-1806) and shared with them his faith in science and similar visionary approach, but not an equal fame. His research was even more unorthodox and imaginative, if possible, as his eccentric designs combined completely reinvented elements from several different styles and epochs.

Lequeu began his career as an architect designing buildings inspired by the antiquity for rich families, but after the Revolution he had to give up the free profession and became a civil servant working as a surveyor and a cartographer until his retirement in 1815. His design skills were then directed to what we might call today “paper architecture“, as he produced several utterly imaginative and extravagant projects that were never realized (and that weren’t even destined to be). Apart from his eccentric creations and “erotic” drawings, he also drew interesting new types for “revolutionary architecture”, along the line of more famous examples by Boullée.

1 2 3 4 5