Showing posts tagged: drawing

  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.
  • A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery
Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.

A Tactic of Survival | Andy Lin | The Draftery

Collaging through layer after layer of mylar, Andy Lin uses his drawing method to develop a hybrid architectural genus. Detroit is again a playground for architectural form. For Lin, the juxtaposition of architectural, social, and animal information creates a hybrid “breed” of architecture. Lin’s hybrids react to existing site conditions through what he calls a “spatial instinct”, rather than by directly addressing program or formal stability. As a result, his drawing process takes control and suggests what each new house might be.

  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.
  • Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.




The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.

Comply with Standard for Building Construction Operations | Tom Ngo | The Draftery

The project is a reinterpretation of a rowhouse built within the confines of 8 units of a self-storage garage. The traditional rowhouse, which is typically symmetrical, was a method for efficiently creating houses. Rowhouse: Unit 4, the title of the project, is for one individual. The rooms are unprogrammed and duplicated to present the occupant with choice and reflects one of main themes found within my work — the removal or blurring of an architectural truth (counter to modernists). The duplicate mailboxes (for the hypothetical mailperson) also reflect this choice and assists in flattening the hierarchies of the spaces on the front facade. By designing the structure in this manner, the building becomes less about need and functionality and more about space, organization and design which I feel are the elements that elevate architecture.

The final tangible deliverable given to a client from an architect is a construction set of drawings which makes real the ideas developed during design. This document does not merely represent the final building but solidifies ideas during the design process. Making real can, unfortunately, come at the cost of artistic merit as the whole package becomes a testament to coordination of the people involved; some of whom don’t care what the drawings look like as long as the information is there. Rowhouse: Unit 4, proposes to shift the artful intent away from typical architectural presentation and process drawings towards the drawing/construction set. The document is produced fully in CAD and the final printed set, each page stamped and signed, sits as the objet d’art.

  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.
  • The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio
Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.

The Unbuilt | Olivier Pershav | Socks Studio

Architectural Association’s Diploma 9, “the Unbuilt” is a “conceptual laboratory” defined as “the world in which students invent, manufacture and design their identities alongside their architectures“. Each student maintains a sort of personal blog where he develops and show his research around his own references, his interpretations and inventions. We stumbled upon these interesting views from above of squared spaces and imaginary towers by Olivier Pershav, one of the Diploma 9 students.

  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 
  • Alex Maymind | Socks Studio
Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 

Alex Maymind | Socks Studio

Drawings represent a strong theoretical interest for Maymind. As a 2012- 2013 Walter B. Sanders Fellow, at the University of Michigan,( Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning), together with other fellows Andrew Holder and Christian Stayner he worked on the project: “100 Drawings, 48 Characters, 12 Landforms: Projects by 2012-13 Architecture Fellows” a series of a hundred drawings organized in four categories. 

  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.

Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio

Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.

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