Showing posts tagged: design

  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.

Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via

There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.

Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.

Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.

  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.

San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter

The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 

A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.

A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.

A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.

A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.

And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.

Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.

  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via

Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.

The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.

  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”
  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”
  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”
  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”
  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”
  • Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via
Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.
”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”

Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via

Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.

”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”

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