Showing posts tagged: art

  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 
  • Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter
Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 
The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 
As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 

Eye-Q, Visual Puzzles for Artists and Architects | Konokopia | Kickstarter

Eye-Q, the Big Book of Visual Puzzles, includes Maciek Jozefowicz's newest puzzle invention, “Architecting”, creating 3D drawings (axonometric) from 2D drawings. 

The book contains a variegated collection of original puzzles, more than 200, including “Pattern Square,” “PlusMinus” and “Remembro”, visual puzzles that challenge and develop visual “Eye-Q” says Jozefowicz. 

As for “Architecting”, the player is asked to create three-dimensional drawings, axonometric, from three two-dimensional drawings, a plan and two elevations (and sometimes, the process is reversed and the player has to create three two-dimensional drawings from the axonometric). 

  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.
  • ‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  
According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.
The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.

‘Boomerang Kids’: Portraits of Millennials Living back Home with Mom and Dad | Damon Casarez | Via

Some delicious irony in regards to this entitled self-righteous millennial architect manifesto of the future from yesterday.  

According to the The New York Times Magazine, 1 in 5 people in their 20s and early 30s find themselves living with their parents. Photographer Damon Casarez contextualizes the struggle for independence in his series Boomerang Kids. Shot in 8 states and over 14 cities, the work is a revealing and compassionate story of Millennials in the United States. A recent graduate with an excessive amount of student loan debt himself, Casarez moved back in with his parents and was inspired to connect with others in his same situation. The perfect storm of economic crises places many young people in a surreal limbo of re-adolescence, the metamorphasis from teenager to independent adult no longer a straight line.

The desired goals and hope of a bright future are frequently in direct contrast to the harsh reality that surrounds graduates. Should one be embarrassed about moving in with their parents again? Is the decision a wise financial choice or simply delaying the inevitable of getting out on their own? With college tuition and debt burden skyrocketing, a competitive market, and an economy full of part-time jobs, questioning what you want feels a luxury. Even those who do manage to obtain a “starter” white collar job are barely able to make ends meet, the higher paying wages possibly never an option in the current climate. With uncertainty and challenge at every turn, there is a surprising endurance to Casarez’s home-bound heros.

  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.
  • The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via
Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.

The Legacy of Frackpool | Jason Lamb | Via

Chinese investment prompts the transitory integration of hydraulic fracturing within Blackpool, for the exploitation of shale gas. An unconventional approach towards hydraulic fracturing instigates urban regeneration and provides a framework which cultivates new industries, generates sustainable water systems and induces renewable methods of energy production.

Thirty-five fracking stations are integrated and a sustainable offshore community is constructed to offset effected communities. During fracking the station serves as a platform from which shale gas can be extracted, processed and distributed.

Over an 80 year timespan, the project speculates the transformation of Blackpool from an industrial Petropolis, to a less resource dependent and decentralized sustainable city. Industrial infrastructure once used for hydraulic fracturing is repurposed to process energy crops and grey water from the region. As a method of urban regeneration, the legacy plan aims to enhance socio-economic and well-being opportunities for communities in Blackpool.

  • 120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio
These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.
With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.
We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.
  • 120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio
These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.
With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.
We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.
  • 120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio
These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.
With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.
We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.
  • 120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio
These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.
With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.
We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.
  • 120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio
These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.
With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.
We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.

120 Doors | Pezo Von Ellrichshausen Architects | Socks Studio

These five perimeters operate as fences that confine a progressive sequence of interiority and depth of the space. Seen from the outside the exterior perimeter is a compact horizontal block. In the interior space is closed laterally and opens to the sky and the ground. This configuration establishes a series of paths along narrow spaces, verti-cal in section, that dissolve into a cubic central space confined within the smallest perimeter.

With this, what we were really looking for was a way to evidence how relative and artificial the distinctions of limits within a work of architecture are and, hence, within one of art. We are interested in exploring the points of transmission, or friction, between one place and another.

We think of the doors as a turning point that sub-verts temporally the definition of space, adding a dynamic dimension to the construction of walls in a work of architecture, something that could be seen as a key that regulates the fluctuation of forces.

  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.
  • What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via
For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.

What’s Inside your Favorite Fireworks | Andrew Waits | Via

For Boom City, photographer Andrew Waits catalogues the outrageous fireworks sold north of Seattle, Washington in the Tulalip reservation. Each year on the 4th of July, families make a mad dash through hundreds of vendors to collect the best bargains on cherry bombs, bottle rockets, firecrackers, and roman candles. Adjacent to the rows of firework stands sits an open field and pit of gravel on which customers set off their recent purchases in elaborate one-man shows.

In his first chapter of the ongoing project, Waits captures the mechanics that ignite the hearts and eyes of rowdy children and daring adults on Independence Day in the Tulalip reservation. Against a stark black backdrop soon to be illuminated by frenetic bursts of light and sound, sit the minimalist Boom City fireworks, many of which are illegal outside the borders of the reservation. Awaiting inevitable combustion, they are bisected to reveal strangely beautiful powders, tubes, and conductors. Resting in suspense in the center of the frame, these small and seemingly benign objects belie a boisterous—and possibly dangerous— celebration to follow.

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