Showing posts tagged: architecture

  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.
  • Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via
There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.
Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.
Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.

Modernist Mash-Up | Victoria Lee | Via

There are certain sacred cows in architecture that need to be slaughtered. Or at least made into delicious sandwiches. That is what Syracuse School of Architecture student Victoria Lee whipped up in her undergraduate thesis, Making by Taking: An Investigation of Architectural Appropriation.

Lee, under the tutelage of her project advisor, Assistant Professor Kyle Miller, took four iconic houses from architectural history and mashed them together, creating hybrid monsters with the pieces of each.

Taking cues from our culture of borrowing and simulating, where everything is copied, pasted, and rehashed, Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, Mies’ Farnsworth house, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Palladio’s Villa Rotunda were closely analyzed, diagrammed, and removed from their cultural context.

SCI-Arc Parodies “Poor Door” Housing Design | Via

In 2008, a group of students from SCI-Arc put out a proposal for a series of mixed income city housing projects for Dubai. In their design, wealthy residents would live in apartments on the building’s perimeter, with natural daylight and views of the city, while low-income housing tenants would live in the core of the building, isolated from “the upper class.”  The proposal was a parody aimed at the classist design of residential development in Dubai, but what unsettled the  students was that their proposal generated almost no controversy. Inspired by the recent approval of a similar ‘poor door’ in a project in New York, this article from the LA Times covers that parody, and shows that both at home and abroad, residential design is slipping towards socio-economic segregation. satire 

paolaechegaray a response to the “poor door” before its time.

A great example showing not everything is a good idea, just because it is presented well and looks nice. 

  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.
  • San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter
The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 
A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.
A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.
A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.
A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.
And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.
Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.

San Precario Exhibition | NSS | The Architecture Lobby | Kickstarter

The good people at North School Studio & The Architecture Lobby are hosting an inaugural exhibition August 15 in a retrofitted weigh station.

For a new exhibition featuring The Architecture Lobby, we propose exciting additions to the Weigh Station that will become permanent resources for the future North School Studio: 

A new curtain facade will tastefully delineate our front porch from the road, creating an intimate gathering space, while protecting people from traffic.

A custom projection screen will facilitate film screenings and presentations.

A modular flooring system made from solid hemlock for dynamic custom seating.

A gallery display to share research, artwork and other 2-dimensional media.

And a faux baroque alter for San Precario himself.

Your financial support will expand the capacities of North School Studio by allowing the Weigh Station to host engaging public events. It will also help advocate for better working conditions for precarious workers across all sectors of the economy. It will especially help the Architecture Lobby express how these issues exist within the field of architecture.

They are looking for some support for the space they are cultivating and and exhibition they are putting together. Check it out on the Kickstarter if it sounds like something you interested in.

  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
  • Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via

Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.

The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.

  • NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People
It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.
Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.
The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”
Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsen explained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.
  • NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People
It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.
Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.
The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”
Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsen explained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.
  • NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People
It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.
Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.
The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”
Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsen explained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.
  • NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People
It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.
Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.
The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”
Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsen explained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.

NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People

It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.

Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.

The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”

Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsen explained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.

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