Showing posts tagged: Politics

  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.
  • Scotland goes to the polls | Via
Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”
Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.
The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.
Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.

Scotland goes to the polls | Via

Voters will answer “Yes” or “No” to the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”

Polling stations opened across each of Scotland’s 32 local authority areas at 07:00 and will remain open until 22:00 on Thursday.

The result is expected in the early hours of Friday morning.

Whatever gets decided, Be safe out there! A difference of opinion does not make someone your enemy.

  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.
  • Scotland’s Big Decision | Via
Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.

Scotland’s Big Decision | Via

Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.

  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 

Conclusus | Alberto Campo BaezaFabio Candido

In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.

The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.

From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.

This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.

The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.
  • Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian
Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.

Air Strike on Gaza | The Guardian

Israel has launched more than 1,300 air strikes since its offensive began, and Palestinian militants have launched more than 800 rockets at Israel, the Israeli military has said. Gaza’s health ministry said 166 Palestinians had been killed. There have been no Israeli fatalities.

  • The Architecture Of Abortion: How Providers Build Their Own Buffer Zones | Via
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Massachusetts law allowing for a 35-foot buffer zone outside clinics offering abortions. The law, which builds off of a similar one in Colorado, went into effect in 2007 and provided a fixed, no-go zone around women’s reproductive health clinics. The buffer zone, which was supported by local law enforcement, limited the proximity of pro-life protestors to the women and the staff entering the facility, thus diminishing public safety concerns.
And public safety is a serious concern. While Roe v. Wade remains legally intact and secures the right to an abortion in the United States, clinic violence represents one of the greatest deterrents to women and to providers. The National Abortion Federation (NAF) has tracked reported cases of violence against clinics since 1977, and the long list of incidents includes eight murders, 17 attempted murders, 42 bombings, 181 arsons, as well as thousands of cases of criminal activity like kidnapping, stalking, and a rash of attacks using butyric acid. Add to that the daily affronts of picketing, obstruction, and intimidation, and you can understand why Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of NAF, said in a statement last week that “buffer zones work” in protecting people.
The SCOTUS ruling serves yet another blow to those hoping to provide safe and accessible reproductive health services to women. While other building types have benefited from the expertise of architects when addressing public safety issues—think, for instance, of the architectural interventions around safety, wayfinding, and crowd control at hospitals, federal buildings, courthouses, and stadiums—reproductive health care clinics rarely see that kind of design support. Clinics are left to fend for themselves and, as a result, are forced to create ad hoc buffer zones where architectural and legislative options have failed to deliver.
  • The Architecture Of Abortion: How Providers Build Their Own Buffer Zones | Via
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Massachusetts law allowing for a 35-foot buffer zone outside clinics offering abortions. The law, which builds off of a similar one in Colorado, went into effect in 2007 and provided a fixed, no-go zone around women’s reproductive health clinics. The buffer zone, which was supported by local law enforcement, limited the proximity of pro-life protestors to the women and the staff entering the facility, thus diminishing public safety concerns.
And public safety is a serious concern. While Roe v. Wade remains legally intact and secures the right to an abortion in the United States, clinic violence represents one of the greatest deterrents to women and to providers. The National Abortion Federation (NAF) has tracked reported cases of violence against clinics since 1977, and the long list of incidents includes eight murders, 17 attempted murders, 42 bombings, 181 arsons, as well as thousands of cases of criminal activity like kidnapping, stalking, and a rash of attacks using butyric acid. Add to that the daily affronts of picketing, obstruction, and intimidation, and you can understand why Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of NAF, said in a statement last week that “buffer zones work” in protecting people.
The SCOTUS ruling serves yet another blow to those hoping to provide safe and accessible reproductive health services to women. While other building types have benefited from the expertise of architects when addressing public safety issues—think, for instance, of the architectural interventions around safety, wayfinding, and crowd control at hospitals, federal buildings, courthouses, and stadiums—reproductive health care clinics rarely see that kind of design support. Clinics are left to fend for themselves and, as a result, are forced to create ad hoc buffer zones where architectural and legislative options have failed to deliver.

The Architecture Of Abortion: How Providers Build Their Own Buffer Zones | Via

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Massachusetts law allowing for a 35-foot buffer zone outside clinics offering abortions. The law, which builds off of a similar one in Colorado, went into effect in 2007 and provided a fixed, no-go zone around women’s reproductive health clinics. The buffer zone, which was supported by local law enforcement, limited the proximity of pro-life protestors to the women and the staff entering the facility, thus diminishing public safety concerns.

And public safety is a serious concern. While Roe v. Wade remains legally intact and secures the right to an abortion in the United States, clinic violence represents one of the greatest deterrents to women and to providers. The National Abortion Federation (NAF) has tracked reported cases of violence against clinics since 1977, and the long list of incidents includes eight murders, 17 attempted murders, 42 bombings, 181 arsons, as well as thousands of cases of criminal activity like kidnapping, stalking, and a rash of attacks using butyric acid. Add to that the daily affronts of picketing, obstruction, and intimidation, and you can understand why Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of NAF, said in a statement last week that “buffer zones work” in protecting people.

The SCOTUS ruling serves yet another blow to those hoping to provide safe and accessible reproductive health services to women. While other building types have benefited from the expertise of architects when addressing public safety issues—think, for instance, of the architectural interventions around safety, wayfinding, and crowd control at hospitals, federal buildings, courthouses, and stadiums—reproductive health care clinics rarely see that kind of design support. Clinics are left to fend for themselves and, as a result, are forced to create ad hoc buffer zones where architectural and legislative options have failed to deliver.

  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.
  • North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via


Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.

North and South Korea through Public Photographs | Dieter Leistner | Via

Until recently, photographic views of North Korea were as controlled as the region itself. With Korea—Korea (Gestalten), the German photographer Dieter Leistner, who obtained special permission to photograph in Pyongyang outside of the normal, highly supervised structure, has made a fascinating comparative study of the capital cities of North and South Korea. Leistner applied his particular vision as an architectural photographer to Pyongyang, North Korea, and Seoul, South Korea, in 2006, and 2012 respectively, to capture the apparent dichotomy between the two places. Although not all pairs are exact comparisons, they have much to communicate with their interaction, and it is immediately apparent which is north and which is south with most pairs. Leistner, who grew up in Germany, has a unique view of this divided nation, coming from a country divided as recently as 25 years ago, seems a distant, unfathomable memory.

  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks
Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.
Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 

The Colors and Transformation of Social Housing in Slovakia | Miroslava Brooks

Based on social-utopian thinking, large scale prefabricated housing complexes were constructed all over Czechoslovakia well into the 1990s. Despite the much criticized repetition and monotony of the architecture, it is important to remember that Panelák, the most iconic building type of socialist architecture in former Czechoslovakia, provided a higher living standard than had existed previously.

Today, the social engineering of communism has largely been replaced by capitalism. With private ownership and beautification processes occurring in many socialist-era developments, urban neighborhoods such as Petržalka in Bratislava [the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe] are gradually changing their appearance with colorful façade renovations, interior upgrades, and reconstruction of their surrounding areas. 
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via

The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.

For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.

The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.

Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka

The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.

More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.

The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.

There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.

  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”

Empire.is | Via

Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).

“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”

Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”

1 2