Showing posts tagged: Politics

  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.
  • Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via
The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.
For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.
The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via

The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.

For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.

The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.
  • Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka
The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.
More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.
The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.
There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.

Life is on a New High | Alicja Dobrucka

The project aims to address the issue of the changing landscape and unregulated construction in the financial capital of India, Mumbai. The city is undergoing a massive construction boom, with more than 15 supertalls, hundreds of skyscrapers and thousands of high-rise buildings under construction. Currently Mumbai is home to the largest number of supertalls and skyscrapers under construction in the world.

More than 2500 high-rise buildings are already constructed in addition to more than a thousand mid-rises existing already. Most of the skyscrapers are residential. Even the richest man in the city lives in a skyscraper. ‘Antilia’ is one of the taller towers in which 27 floors accommodate a family of four and 200 servants.

The population density is estimated to be about 20,482 persons per square kilometre. The living space is 4.5 square metre per person. The number of slum-dwellers is estimated to be 9 million - that is, 62% of all Mumbaikers live in desolate slums.

There is no centralized urban planning and the towers keep popping up in all areas of central Mumbai, in particular on the huge pieces of land that accommodated textile factories that are now closed, as well as in the suburbs. The building companies are supported by the government and are given tax exemption.

  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”
  • Empire.is | Via
Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).
“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”
Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”

Empire.is | Via

Empire.is, by Josh Begley, is a haunting site that plots the United States’ known military bases around the globe, then shows you their photographs (courtesy of Google and Bing image search).

“I’m not really interested in exposing secret bases,” Begley tells us. “I suppose I’m just trying to sketch the broad contours of our military footprint: what does it look like from above? How does it appear on a map? And in a fashion similar to the project I made about American prisons last year, how might we see this landscape as one continuous scroll?”

Not everything is visible. Bing and Google both censor satellite imagery not only by limiting our zoom, but by creating other interventions to separate the public from sensitive information (and not always in tandem). Volkel Air Base in the Netherlands, for instance, has been obfuscated at the request of their government. On Google, it’s a wash of green polygons, while on Bing, it’s a black blob. Meanwhile, a secret drone base that Wired’s Danger Room uncovered in Saudi Arabia appears fairly clearly on Bing, whereas Google provides a simple gray box that reads, “Sorry, we have no imagery here.”

  • NY condo has separate entrances for Rich and Poor via NYPost
The poor will use a separate door under plans for a new Upper West Side luxury tower — where affordable housing will be segregated from ritzy waterfront condos despite being in the same building.
Manhattan developer Extell is seeking millions in air rights and tax breaks for building 55 low-income units at 40 Riverside Boulevard, but the company is sequestering the cash-poor tenants who make the lucrative incentives possible.
Five floors of affordable housing will face away from the Hudson River and have a separate entrance, elevator and maintenance company, while 219 market-rate condominiums will overlook the waterfront.
Extell declined to comment.
  • NY condo has separate entrances for Rich and Poor via NYPost
The poor will use a separate door under plans for a new Upper West Side luxury tower — where affordable housing will be segregated from ritzy waterfront condos despite being in the same building.
Manhattan developer Extell is seeking millions in air rights and tax breaks for building 55 low-income units at 40 Riverside Boulevard, but the company is sequestering the cash-poor tenants who make the lucrative incentives possible.
Five floors of affordable housing will face away from the Hudson River and have a separate entrance, elevator and maintenance company, while 219 market-rate condominiums will overlook the waterfront.
Extell declined to comment.

NY condo has separate entrances for Rich and Poor via NYPost

The poor will use a separate door under plans for a new Upper West Side luxury tower — where affordable housing will be segregated from ritzy waterfront condos despite being in the same building.

Manhattan developer Extell is seeking millions in air rights and tax breaks for building 55 low-income units at 40 Riverside Boulevard, but the company is sequestering the cash-poor tenants who make the lucrative incentives possible.

Five floors of affordable housing will face away from the Hudson River and have a separate entrance, elevator and maintenance company, while 219 market-rate condominiums will overlook the waterfront.

Extell declined to comment.

Vietnam Veterans Against the War occupy the Statue of Liberty via Retronaut
“On December 26, 1971, fifteen VVAW activists barricaded and occupied the Statue of Liberty for two days in a successful attempt to bring attention to the antiwar cause. VVAW occupied the Statue of Liberty a second time in 1976 to bring renewed attention to veteran issues.” - Wikipedia 

Vietnam Veterans Against the War occupy the Statue of Liberty via Retronaut

“On December 26, 1971, fifteen VVAW activists barricaded and occupied the Statue of Liberty for two days in a successful attempt to bring attention to the antiwar cause. VVAW occupied the Statue of Liberty a second time in 1976 to bring renewed attention to veteran issues.” - Wikipedia 

  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)
  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)
  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)
  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)
  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)
  • “PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio
Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.
- India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)
- Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)
- Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)
- Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images
- Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)
- Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)

“PEACE” LINES: A SELECTION OF WALLS DIVIDING REGIONS via Socks Studio

Some days ago, Italian news website il Post selected and published the photographs of a number of still-standing or just-erected physical barriers between countries, regions, ethnies, religious groups or conflicting cultures.

India-Pakistan, Photo: January 16, 2013 (AP Photo / Channi Anand)

Saudi Arabia – Yemen, Photo: February 9, 2004 (KHALED FAZAA / AFP / Getty Images)

Belfast, Northern Ireland, (AP Photo / Peter Kemp)

Israel – Egypt, Photo by Moshe Milner / GPO via Getty Images

Tijuana, Mexico, Photo: August 12, 2012 (FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / GettyImages)

Dandong, China, Photo: October 16, 2006 (LIU JIN / AFP / Getty Images)

China declares war on Apple - Salon.com
The Chinese are no exception when it comes to Apple users’ loyalty, and they’re coming to the iPhone maker’s defense following a widespread state media campaign accusing the Cupertino, Calif. company of greed and arrogance.
One of the latest salvos came in an op-ed today in the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily that ripped into the computer company under the headline “Destroy Apple’s Unparalleled Arrogance.”
It accuses Apple of “Westerners’ traditional sense of superiority” in its policies toward China. Although China requires all companies to offer two-year warranties for thier products, Apple has only a one-year global warranty for its devices, according to People’s Daily.
The article denounces Apple for being greedy, profit-driven, and “arrogant” in what Beijing commentator Bill Bishop calls a “fairly nasty nationalist tone.”

China declares war on Apple - Salon.com

The Chinese are no exception when it comes to Apple users’ loyalty, and they’re coming to the iPhone maker’s defense following a widespread state media campaign accusing the Cupertino, Calif. company of greed and arrogance.

One of the latest salvos came in an op-ed today in the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily that ripped into the computer company under the headline “Destroy Apple’s Unparalleled Arrogance.”

It accuses Apple of “Westerners’ traditional sense of superiority” in its policies toward China. Although China requires all companies to offer two-year warranties for thier products, Apple has only a one-year global warranty for its devices, according to People’s Daily.

The article denounces Apple for being greedy, profit-driven, and “arrogant” in what Beijing commentator Bill Bishop calls a “fairly nasty nationalist tone.”

  • Parliamentary Chambers by Ana Filipovic via Deconcrete
Parliamentary Chambers, by Ana Filipovic, 2012, within Cultures of Assembly, Architecture + Critical Spatial Practice, Städelschule Frankfurt:
‘The word parliament derives from the French “parlement”—the act of speaking, the discussion. The chamber in which parliamentary assemblies meet is therefore a spatial setting for that very discussion. The comprehension of the nature of this discussion should hence inform the architectural design.
The spatial organization of formal assemblies has not substantially changed much from Athenian assembly to the modern concept of prime ministerial government that goes back to the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707–1800) and The Parliamentary System in Sweden (1721–1772) that coincided with each other. Classical democracy not only influenced the formation of later constitutions, it also created an architectural legacy which has dominated both the form and style of parliament buildings to the present day. [Sudjic, Deyan, “Architecture And Democracy”, Laurence King Publishing, 1992]
The most appropriate form remained to be hemicycle—semicircular, or horseshoe shaped, debating chamber (plenary chamber), where members sit to discuss and pass legislation.
The circular shape is one, which was primarily designed to encourage the politics of consensus among political parties rather than confrontation. The design is used in most European countries (and hence was adopted by the European Parliament) and the United States. The equality in its shape—the equal distance from the speaker, for example—is being used whenever democratic dialogue is anticipated. In contrast, the Westminster system, in which the government and opposition parties face each other on opposing sets of benches, points at an interesting potential: the exploration and exacerbation of spatial confrontation and conflict as a form of agonistic ground condition. This research questions the seemingly causal relationship between the spaces of parliamentary chambers and the system they represent.’
  • Parliamentary Chambers by Ana Filipovic via Deconcrete
Parliamentary Chambers, by Ana Filipovic, 2012, within Cultures of Assembly, Architecture + Critical Spatial Practice, Städelschule Frankfurt:
‘The word parliament derives from the French “parlement”—the act of speaking, the discussion. The chamber in which parliamentary assemblies meet is therefore a spatial setting for that very discussion. The comprehension of the nature of this discussion should hence inform the architectural design.
The spatial organization of formal assemblies has not substantially changed much from Athenian assembly to the modern concept of prime ministerial government that goes back to the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707–1800) and The Parliamentary System in Sweden (1721–1772) that coincided with each other. Classical democracy not only influenced the formation of later constitutions, it also created an architectural legacy which has dominated both the form and style of parliament buildings to the present day. [Sudjic, Deyan, “Architecture And Democracy”, Laurence King Publishing, 1992]
The most appropriate form remained to be hemicycle—semicircular, or horseshoe shaped, debating chamber (plenary chamber), where members sit to discuss and pass legislation.
The circular shape is one, which was primarily designed to encourage the politics of consensus among political parties rather than confrontation. The design is used in most European countries (and hence was adopted by the European Parliament) and the United States. The equality in its shape—the equal distance from the speaker, for example—is being used whenever democratic dialogue is anticipated. In contrast, the Westminster system, in which the government and opposition parties face each other on opposing sets of benches, points at an interesting potential: the exploration and exacerbation of spatial confrontation and conflict as a form of agonistic ground condition. This research questions the seemingly causal relationship between the spaces of parliamentary chambers and the system they represent.’

Parliamentary Chambers by Ana Filipovic via Deconcrete

Parliamentary Chambers, by Ana Filipovic, 2012, within Cultures of Assembly, Architecture + Critical Spatial Practice, Städelschule Frankfurt:

‘The word parliament derives from the French “parlement”—the act of speaking, the discussion. The chamber in which parliamentary assemblies meet is therefore a spatial setting for that very discussion. The comprehension of the nature of this discussion should hence inform the architectural design.

The spatial organization of formal assemblies has not substantially changed much from Athenian assembly to the modern concept of prime ministerial government that goes back to the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707–1800) and The Parliamentary System in Sweden (1721–1772) that coincided with each other. Classical democracy not only influenced the formation of later constitutions, it also created an architectural legacy which has dominated both the form and style of parliament buildings to the present day. [Sudjic, Deyan, “Architecture And Democracy”, Laurence King Publishing, 1992]

The most appropriate form remained to be hemicycle—semicircular, or horseshoe shaped, debating chamber (plenary chamber), where members sit to discuss and pass legislation.

The circular shape is one, which was primarily designed to encourage the politics of consensus among political parties rather than confrontation. The design is used in most European countries (and hence was adopted by the European Parliament) and the United States. The equality in its shape—the equal distance from the speaker, for example—is being used whenever democratic dialogue is anticipated. In contrast, the Westminster system, in which the government and opposition parties face each other on opposing sets of benches, points at an interesting potential: the exploration and exacerbation of spatial confrontation and conflict as a form of agonistic ground condition. This research questions the seemingly causal relationship between the spaces of parliamentary chambers and the system they represent.’

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 via wiki
The Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 was a march down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913, organized by the suffragist Alice Paul for the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The march was scheduled on the day before President Woodrow Wilson's inauguration to “march in a spirit of protest against the present political organization of society, from which women are excluded”, as the official program stated.

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 via wiki

The Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 was a march down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913, organized by the suffragist Alice Paul for the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The march was scheduled on the day before President Woodrow Wilson's inauguration to “march in a spirit of protest against the present political organization of society, from which women are excluded”, as the official program stated.

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