Showing posts tagged: Drawing

  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.
  • Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio
Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.

Infinite Stairs and Dissected Buildings | Marcin Bialas | Socks Studio

Marcin Bialas is a Polish artist who’s specialized in etchings and drawings in black an white. Among his large production, a recurring theme is dissected buildings and surreal constructions, such as infinite staircases and labyrinthine interiors, an atemporal combination of G.B. Piranesi and Brodsky/Utkin prints. The structures seem unfinished, yet already in ruin, able to plunge the viewer into an uncomfortable feeling. Somewhere between nightmares and theatrical settings, Marcin Bialas’ retro drawings explore the dramatic potential of different projections and points of view.

  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
  • The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.

The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery

Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.

  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.
  • One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio
American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.
The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.

One City | Will Insley | Socks Studio

American artist Will Insley worked for over 40 years on a monumental project, the planning of an imaginary city called “OneCity”. Starting in the 1950s, with a huge series of paintings and drawings, the artist constructed an urban vision which he completed with writings on the social and political structures associated with the physical aspects. Insley asserted that the project has its roots in ancient myths rather than in utopian views or contemporary urban planning theories and projects.

The architectural layout of OneCity consists of over 14000 square metres of nine-story buildings. Each one is two and half miles wide and is divided into an “Over-building” and an “Under-building”, with nine underground floors. The overall system takes the shape of a labyrinthine semi-buried complex, located between the Mississippi and the Rockies, able to host the whole population of the United States at the time: 400 millions people. The architectural language is rather sculptural  with an attempt to an atemporal style, lacking any ornament or recognizability of functions.

1 2 3 4 5