Showing posts tagged: Design

  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 

36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via

Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 

  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.

320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via

The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.

Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.

The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.

With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.

  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.

Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via

Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.

Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.

Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.

Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.

  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.

Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via

If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.

Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.

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