Showing posts tagged: Art

  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 
  • 36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via
Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 

36 Ventilators, 4.7m³ Packing Chips | Zimoun | Via

Continuing the trademark use of mechanical devices — and the bewildering visual and acoustic effects they inherently produce — bern-based studio Zimoun presents ’36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips’ at the art museum of lugano, Switzerland. The installation fills the entirety of the space with thousands of styrofoam pieces, swirling them into a massive and immersive plastic blizzard. Thirty-six ventilators — four situated in each window of the space — whirl the flakes into an continuous vortex of kinetic matter and, when lit at night by halogen spotlights, the scene recalls the swarming of insects in glass cases. 

  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.
  • 320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via
The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.
Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.
The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.
With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.

320° Licht | Urbanscreen | Via

The ‘320° Licht’ installation of Urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Gasometer as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light.

Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer.

The observer experiences the interplay between real and virtual space, in which the Gasometer seems to dissolve into its own, filigree structures and yet finally always reverts to its clear shape. ’320° Licht’ has been achieved with kind project support from Epson Germany.

With approx 20,000 square meters of area played upon, the installation is among the world’s largest and technically most sophisticated interior projections - interconnecting 21 powerful projectors to one projection screen.

  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.

Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via

Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.

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