Showing posts tagged: Art

  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.
  • Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via
Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.

Rabot Towers | Pieter Lozie | Via

Rabot Towers, an abandoned public housing project in Ghent, Belgium. When the first stage of demolition removed the building’s exterior walls, the former blight became an unexpected beauty. The three-tower complex once accommodated around 840 residents. However, with the building no longer fit for occupation and an overhaul deemed too expensive, the project is now slated for demolition.

  • The Landscape as Object | Giuseppe Licari | Via
The landscape of tuscany is praised for its natural beauty, yet few people know about its artificial design. The val d’orcia region is an extraordinary example of the way the italian panorama was re-designed during the renaissance, now inscribed in the list of unesco heritage and protected by several regulations. Local artist Giuseppe Licari has inscribed a land art intervention into the countryside scene, transforming the valley into a commercial product. ‘Registered: the landscape as object’ acts as a question mark to the residents and to the tourists visiting the area, asking ‘to whom does this landscape really belong? who has the ownership of its beauty and harmony?’, as licari describes. Seen from the main square of castiglioncello del trinoro, the registered symbol highlights the manufactured makeup of the natural environment, deprived from its natural evolution and remaining artificially frozen.
  • The Landscape as Object | Giuseppe Licari | Via
The landscape of tuscany is praised for its natural beauty, yet few people know about its artificial design. The val d’orcia region is an extraordinary example of the way the italian panorama was re-designed during the renaissance, now inscribed in the list of unesco heritage and protected by several regulations. Local artist Giuseppe Licari has inscribed a land art intervention into the countryside scene, transforming the valley into a commercial product. ‘Registered: the landscape as object’ acts as a question mark to the residents and to the tourists visiting the area, asking ‘to whom does this landscape really belong? who has the ownership of its beauty and harmony?’, as licari describes. Seen from the main square of castiglioncello del trinoro, the registered symbol highlights the manufactured makeup of the natural environment, deprived from its natural evolution and remaining artificially frozen.

The Landscape as Object | Giuseppe Licari | Via

The landscape of tuscany is praised for its natural beauty, yet few people know about its artificial design. The val d’orcia region is an extraordinary example of the way the italian panorama was re-designed during the renaissance, now inscribed in the list of unesco heritage and protected by several regulations. Local artist Giuseppe Licari has inscribed a land art intervention into the countryside scene, transforming the valley into a commercial product. ‘Registered: the landscape as object’ acts as a question mark to the residents and to the tourists visiting the area, asking ‘to whom does this landscape really belong? who has the ownership of its beauty and harmony?’, as licari describes. Seen from the main square of castiglioncello del trinoro, the registered symbol highlights the manufactured makeup of the natural environment, deprived from its natural evolution and remaining artificially frozen.

  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”
  • Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via
For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.
Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.
“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”

Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via

For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.

Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.

“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”

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