Showing posts tagged: Architecture

  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via
Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.
Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Via

Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is the largest building in the world dedicated to the containment and preservation of rare books, manuscripts, and documents. Completed in 1963 and situated on Yale University’s campus, in New Haven, Connecticut, the library has room for approximately 780,000 volumes. Currently, it holds about 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts including the original Gutenberg Bible and the mysterious Voynich manuscript, among several others.

Before the construction of the library, rare and valuable books of the Library of Yale College were placed on special shelving at the College Library, now known as Dwight Hall. Later in 1930, when the Sterling Memorial Library was being built, the university created a dedicated reading room for its rare books. As the collection grew, Sterling’s reading room became too small and unsuitable for preservation of the delicate manuscripts, and the need for a larger library was felt.

  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.
  • Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via
Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.
In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.
Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.

Deposit | Yann Mingard | Via

Not all data centers are the same. There are cloud storage mega-centers all over Silicon Valley that take care of our smartphone camera rolls and contacts lists. There are the NSA’s data centers, which do similar things but the permissions are (at least in theory) different.

In his series Deposit, Swiss photographer Yann Mingard reveals another type of data storage facility: the privately owned bunker space within which individuals, companies and even nation-states secure their most precious code, papers, and in some cases, genetic material. These data centers aren’t intended to intercept or analyze data; they’re merely meant to protect the contents from virus, loss and—most of all—from snooping.

Mingard’s exquisite darkened images of data centers from Switzerland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom form the fourth and final chapter of Deposit, a sprawling four-year project which meditates on the anxieties of contemporary life. Deposit delves deep into the real and perceived threats to human survival, and the emerging technologies that promise security.

  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.
  • Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via
Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.
From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.
Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.

Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013 | Brian Rose | Via

Perhaps no part of Manhattan has changed as dramatically since the 1980s as the Meatpacking District. Located on the Lower West Side, the district has gone from a blue-collar warehouse district with a seedy side into a hyper-luxurious, bustling neighborhood.

From the High Line to the expensive shops and restaurants along the oldcobblestone streets, everything looks quite different from when Brian Rosefirst brought his camera to the Meatpacking District. A young photographer in 1985, Rose spent a few days that winter walking around the area in the mid-afternoon, after the meat markets closed and before the sex clubs opened. Right around the time Rose took his photos, one of those clubs, The Mineshaft, was shut down by the city for permitting ”high-risk sexual activity” during the worsening AIDS epidemic.

Rose never got around to printing the film from that shoot—until 2012. Blown away by what he saw when compared his photographs to those same streets and buildings today, he decided to re-create each shot. The result is an incredible set of then-and-nows in the new book Metamorphosis: Meatpacking District 1985 + 2013.

  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.
  • Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via
Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.

Net Linz | Numen/For use | Via

Acting as supplementary staircase in the exhibition space at the OK center for contemporary art, ‘net linz’ by croatian-austrian design collective numen/for use is an inhabitable and climbable social sculpture made of intricately interwoven mesh. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. their vertical orientation, reaching towards the height of the room, results in a canyon-like path, where the visitor must slowly swing as they meander along the steep and undulating aisle.

  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus
  • The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio
“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.
“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.
“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”
- Marc Yankus

The Space Between | Marc Yankus | Socks Studio

“In New York, where I grew up and where I live and work, I feel acutely aware of the passage of time and the changes left in its wake. Living in a mutable, fast paced city like New York is, in itself, a surreal experience. At times, the world passes us by in soft focus, where details fall to the wayside and the overall tone of our environment is what characterizes our experience of the city. At other times, we find ourselves raptured by specific details, when we focus intently and intensely on the object of our affection and interest.

“My work attempts to capture this variation in experience, by bringing to the forefront the altered reality in which we live. In the city’s moments of tranquility, especially at dusk and when night falls, the looming shapes, diffused light and spectral shadows infuse the recurrent transition with a hushed feeling of magic and anticipation that I seek to capture in my photographs.

“In my newest body of work I turn away from the soft focus, which characterized much of my earlier imagery. In these photographs of the city, there is a very precise, almost hyper-real quality. I am exploring the fine line between urban reality and architectural fiction though surreal portraits of buildings.”

Marc Yankus

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