• The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  
  • The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via
The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.
The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  

The Child and the Vertical City | Elly Ward | Via

The continuing housing crisis provides an opportunity to re-examine post-war ideas about how to accommodate the city’s workers and their families in our increasingly vertical city. This proposal for a 32 storey tower revisits ‘streets-in-the-sky’ as articulated by the Smithson’s and other architects of that era and takes the theory to its absolute zenith with a one mile long continuous street spiralling upwards through its interior.

The design could be described as ‘Park Hill meets the Guggenheim’ and aspires to a vertical neighbourhood that embraces and encourages civic interaction, where the morning school run and the daily commute circumnavigate each other, and the milk delivery and rubbish collection take place centre stage on the street.  

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