• The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.
  • The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak
In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.
The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.

The Humanities - The ABC of Humankind | Olivier Nowak

In Germany, the focus in 2007 was on the Humanities. Our mission: to make the abstract “Year of the Humanities” as visible as possible in public spaces.

The idea: the alphabet. Gigantic letters were attached to highly symbolic locations – with an artistic dimension. For instance, in front of the Bundeskanzleramt, a „D“ stands for democracy. Special feature: The sections only combine to form a letter when the viewer is at the right vantage point. The result was Germany’s largest alphabet – architecture and design made the Humanities visible.

  • Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via
The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.
The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.
  • Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via
The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.
The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.
  • Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via
The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.
The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.

Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via

The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.

The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.

There is a myth, sometimes widespread, that a person need do only inner work, in order to be alive like this; that a man is entirely responsible for his own problems; and that to cure himself, he need only change himself. This teaching has some value, since it is so easy for a man to imagine that his problems are caused by ‘others.’ But it is a one-sided and mistaken view which also maintains the arrogance of the belief that the individual is self-sufficient, and not dependent in any essential way on his surroundings.
The fact is, a person is so far formed by his surroundings, that his state of harmony depends entirely on his harmony with his surroundings.

Christopher Alexander, The Timeless Way of Building (via evocativesynthesis)

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