• The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.
  • The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via
Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.

The Red Earth Terraces of Dongchuan, China | Via

Some 250 kilometers northeast of Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan Province, lies Dongchuan, a rural area with the world’s most imposing red earth. Spread over vast terraced fields, Dongchuan’s unusual brownish-red color comes from its rich deposit of iron and copper. Exposed to the warm and humid climate of Yunnan, the iron in the soil undergoes oxidization to form iron oxide which is naturally red in color. These oxides, deposited through many years, gradually developed into the extraordinary reddish brown soil seen here today. Every year during spring, when this area is ploughed for agriculture, a large number of visitors and photographers come to see squares of freshly upturned red earth waiting to be sown along with areas of budding green plants. The fiery red soil juxtaposed with emerald green barley, and golden yellow buckwheat, against a blue sky produces one of the richest color palate rarely seen in nature.

A+D, who?

aplusdmuseum:

image

The Architecture and Design Museum>Los Angeles, isn’t simply a museum about architecture and design. It is a multi-dimensional institution that pushes the limits of what a museum is and what it’s role is in society.  

Traditionally speaking, a museum is an institution that cares for a collection of artifacts of scientific, cultural, or historical importance, that serves researchers, specialists, and the general public. A+D goes completely against this definition because it does not collect or care for artifacts, nor is the process of knowledge making and disseminating one-sided. 

Instead, A+D acts as a forum for people to get together and discuss contemporary issues that helps shape our LA. It acts as a social space, an exhibit space, and an educational force for local architect, designers, and design enthusiasts.

A+D’s purpose is to facilitate networking and interchange among a broad range of disciplines, from graphic design to product design, landscape architecture to interior design, urban design, and design in the entertainments industry. To top it off, A+D’s innovative programming encourages fresh thinking among a broad and inclusive audience of design professionals, students of all ages and the general public.

All of these aspects are created and designed for the purpose of achieving the Museum’s goal - which is to celebrate and promote an awareness of progressive architecture and design in everyday life.

We have created this blog to help achieve this mission.

  • Speedy Prefab: How a 9-Story Apartment Was Built in 5 Days | Via
The recently-completed One9 building in Melbourne, Australia, using the Hickory Group’s Unitized Building system to install 34 units in less than 1 week around a prefab-paneled concrete core.
Created by architect Nonda Katsalidis, this approach allows each one-or-two-bedroom dwelling to be built almost entirely offsite then stacked like a puzzle piece onto the site, completed with decks and fenestration in place.
Utility connections are also built in, making it easy to hook up electrical and plumbing systems. In theory, the process can be used to build up to 70-story structures.
  • Speedy Prefab: How a 9-Story Apartment Was Built in 5 Days | Via
The recently-completed One9 building in Melbourne, Australia, using the Hickory Group’s Unitized Building system to install 34 units in less than 1 week around a prefab-paneled concrete core.
Created by architect Nonda Katsalidis, this approach allows each one-or-two-bedroom dwelling to be built almost entirely offsite then stacked like a puzzle piece onto the site, completed with decks and fenestration in place.
Utility connections are also built in, making it easy to hook up electrical and plumbing systems. In theory, the process can be used to build up to 70-story structures.
  • Speedy Prefab: How a 9-Story Apartment Was Built in 5 Days | Via
The recently-completed One9 building in Melbourne, Australia, using the Hickory Group’s Unitized Building system to install 34 units in less than 1 week around a prefab-paneled concrete core.
Created by architect Nonda Katsalidis, this approach allows each one-or-two-bedroom dwelling to be built almost entirely offsite then stacked like a puzzle piece onto the site, completed with decks and fenestration in place.
Utility connections are also built in, making it easy to hook up electrical and plumbing systems. In theory, the process can be used to build up to 70-story structures.
  • Speedy Prefab: How a 9-Story Apartment Was Built in 5 Days | Via
The recently-completed One9 building in Melbourne, Australia, using the Hickory Group’s Unitized Building system to install 34 units in less than 1 week around a prefab-paneled concrete core.
Created by architect Nonda Katsalidis, this approach allows each one-or-two-bedroom dwelling to be built almost entirely offsite then stacked like a puzzle piece onto the site, completed with decks and fenestration in place.
Utility connections are also built in, making it easy to hook up electrical and plumbing systems. In theory, the process can be used to build up to 70-story structures.

Speedy Prefab: How a 9-Story Apartment Was Built in 5 Days | Via

The recently-completed One9 building in Melbourne, Australia, using the Hickory Group’s Unitized Building system to install 34 units in less than 1 week around a prefab-paneled concrete core.

Created by architect Nonda Katsalidis, this approach allows each one-or-two-bedroom dwelling to be built almost entirely offsite then stacked like a puzzle piece onto the site, completed with decks and fenestration in place.

Utility connections are also built in, making it easy to hook up electrical and plumbing systems. In theory, the process can be used to build up to 70-story structures.

  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.
  • Jerry House | Onion | Via
'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.

Jerry House | Onion | Via

'Jerry house’ by Onion is the holiday home of a married couple with four sons in cha am beach, Thailand. In 2011, the clients asked the architects to turn their seaside abode, which was then under construction, into the gathering place for the family’s members and friends. The requirement was to create a place that behaves unlike a typical house where minimal circulation is the norm, but rather like a playground where residents are encouraged to interact in such a way that none of their domestic spaces in Bangkok would enable them to.

  • skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways
In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more
  • skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways
In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more
  • skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways
In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more
  • skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways
In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more

skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways

In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more

  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.
  • Hello Wood | Via
Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.

Hello Wood | Via

Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian Countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to “play with balance,” which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts – but also generated a whole lot of play, too.

  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
  • Conclusus | Alberto Campo Baeza | Fabio Candido
In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.
The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.
From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.
This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.
The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 

Conclusus | Alberto Campo BaezaFabio Candido

In recent years, the many European citizens believe that their Countries suffer an oppressive bureaucracy, due to the redundancy of public authorities.

The Junta de Castilla y Leòn, client of the project of Alberto Campo Baeza, is a local authority that by nature should have a direct relationship with the territory and citizens. This is the reason why Campo Baeza - as himself writes - focused his work on the relationship between inner space and outer space, opening the wall to select with accuracy some views of the city. It is an exemplary design on the theme of hortus conclusus.

From many sides the Junta de Castilla y Leòn is considered an useless and inefficient authority, due to a cultural detachment between its policy and citizen’s demands. Furthermore - maybe for this reason - many Zamora’s inhabitants perceive as a negative factor the detachment between the authority’s offices and the city, due to the fence. Maybe the windows in the wall are not adequate because the client is far from the territory.

This photographic work analyze the condition of detachment between architecture (authority) and the city (citizenry), showing the image of a building suspended in its own closure.

The perception of the scale becomes ambiguous. The relationship figure-background is resolved in its own: the building is alternately figure and background of itself. This architecture is sophisticated, refined in its shape and details, but is limited in a suspended and laconic dimension. 
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