• Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio
Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.
  • Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio
Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.
  • Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio
Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.
  • Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio
Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.
  • Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio
Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.

Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio

Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.

  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”
  • The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

The Long Shadow of Chernobyl | Gerd Ludwig | Via

Part of the mystery and terror of the Chernobyl disaster is the invisibility of the threat. The explosion at the Vladimir Ilyich Lenin nuclear power plant released more radiation than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and one might never know they were being poisoned until months, even years later. Veteran photographer Gerd Ludwig’s spent 20 years photographing the area, chronicling the ongoing consequences of the radioactive release.

“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you don’t smell it, you don’t taste it, but it’s there,” he says. “It’s around you, and that makes many people oblivious to the danger.”

  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.
  • Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via

When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 

Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 

The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.

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