• prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!
  • prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!
  • prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!
  • prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!
  • prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!
  • prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal
Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.
The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.
Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.
More? Go to Pretty Architecture!Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!

prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal

Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.

The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.

Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.

More? Go to Pretty Architecture!
Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!

  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.
  • Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via
Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.
Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.
Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.
Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.

Chinese Firm 3D Prints 10 Homes in 24 Hours | Via

Chinese companies have been known to build major real-estate projects very quickly. Now, one company is taking it to a new extreme.

Suzhou-based construction-materials firm Winsun New Materials says it has built 10 200-square-meter homes using a gigantic 3-D printer that it spent 20 million yuan ($3.2 million) and 12 years developing.

Such 3-D printers have been around for several years and are commonly used to make models, prototypes, plane parts and even such small items as jewelry. The printing involves an additive process, where successive layers of material are stacked on top of one another to create a finished product.

Winsun’s 3-D printer is 6.6 meters (22 feet) tall, 10 meters wide and 150 meters long, the firm said, and the “ink” it uses is created from a combination of cement and glass fibers. In a nod to China’s green agenda, Winsun said in the future it plans to use scrap material left over from construction and mining sites to make its 3-D buildings.

  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.
  • Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via
If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.
Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.

Walmart Is Downsizing Its Superstores and Putting Apartments on Top | Via

If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.

Fort Totten Square, designed by Hickok Cole Architects, is a sharp departure from the retailer’s usual formula. Hickok Cole is placing 345 residential units above a Walmart that, at 125,000 square feet, is hardly small, but is a step down from its “supercenter” format, which averages 180,000 square feet. On top of the Walmart, four stories of apartments will wrap around two large courtyards, one with a swimming pool. At the northeast corner of the site, smaller stores and restaurants will occupy another 10,000 square feet. The Fort Totten Metro station, offering access to three subway lines, is a five-minute walk away.

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